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Pandora Accused of Cheating

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Record labels have now decided to sue Pandora in the New York Supreme Court for not issuing royalties to artists. Any artist recordings released before 1972 have not received any royalty payments. Pandora says these recordings are not covered by federal copyright and do not need to be paid out.

Labels have been looking for loopholes and may have found their answer. The labels believe that these digital music services should be covered. Digital music is so big in this day and age. People old and young have access to digital music in their daily lives. Old songs are now new again and these works should be compensated. Master recording for copyrights were not created until 1972. Labels say their master recordings should be protected by individual state copyright laws and should receive royalty payments. Radio conglomerates and streaming services need to stop looking for unnecessary loopholes and start practicing honest business. They need to compensate musicians and artists for their hard work, instead of trying to scam them. There is enough money for everyone to make.

SoundExchange estimates, in 2013 alone, that non-payment for pre 1972 recordings cost artist and labels over $60 million in royalties. With the lawsuit in full swing, Pandora refuses to pay royalties, which is unfair to the labels and artists.  Steve Cropper, a well-known musician stated, “Why would they not want to compensate me for my work? It’s an injustice that boggles the mind. Just like the programmers who deserve to be paid for their work, I deserve to be paid for mine.” Many artists feel the same way. Artists that are retired and had their big break in the 50s and 60s are struggling, when Pandora should be paying them for their work. I feel that any musician or artist’s music that has been copyrighted and is not public domain should be compensated for their work.

 

 

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One thought on “Pandora Accused of Cheating

  1. Pingback: Project 72 campaign aims for equal royalties in digital radio - Los Angeles Times | mostly music

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